Usage

$ composer install
$ phpunit
Usage
     Writing tests
         Data Providers
         Grouping tests

Configuration is stored in phpunit.xml.

Make sure you only whitelist the highest files in the cascading filesystem, else you could end up with a lot of "class cannot be redefined" errors.

If you use the tests.php testsuite loader then it will only whitelist the highest files. see config/unittest.php for details on configuring the tests.php whitelist.

Writing tests

If you're writing a test for your application, place it in "application/tests". Similarly, if you're writing a test for a module place it in modules/modulefolder/tests

Rather than tell you how to write tests I'll point you in the direction of the PHPUnit Manual. One thing you should bear in mind when writing tests is that testcases should extend Unittest_Testcase rather than PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase, doing so gives you access to useful kohana specific helpers such as setEnvironment().

Here's a taster of some of the cool things you can do with phpunit:

Data Providers

Sometimes you want to be able to run a specific test with different sets of data to try and test every eventuality

Ordinarily you could use a foreach loop to iterate over an array of test data, however PHPUnit already can take care of this for us rather easily using "Data Providers". A data provider is a function that returns an array of arguments that can be passed to a test.

<?php

Class ReallyCoolTest extends Unittest_TestCase
{
    function providerStrLen()
    {
        return array(
            array('One set of testcase data', 24),
            array('This is a different one', 23),
        );
    }

    /**
     * @dataProvider providerStrLen
     */
    function testStrLen($string, $length)
    {
        $this->assertSame(
            $length,
            strlen($string)
        );
    }
}

The key thing to notice is the @dataProvider tag in the doccomment, this is what tells PHPUnit to use a data provider. The provider prefix is totally optional but it's a nice standard to identify providers.

For more info see:

Grouping tests

To allow users to selectively run tests you need to organise your tests into groups. Here's an example test showing how to do this:

<?php

/**
 * This is a description for my testcase
 *
 * @group somegroup
 * @group somegroup.morespecific
 */
Class AnotherReallyCoolTest extends Unittest_TestCase
{
    /**
     * Tests can also be grouped too!
     *
     * @group somegroup.morespecific.annoyingstuff
     */
    function testSomeAnnoyingCase()
    {
        // CODE!!
    }
}

Our convention is to use lowercase group names, with more specific levels in a group seperated by periods. i.e. The Validate helper tests are part of the following groups:

kohana
kohana.validation
kohana.validation.helpers

To actually limit your testing to the "somegroup" group, use:

$ phpunit --group=somegroup

This functionality can be used to record which bug reports a test is for:

/**
 *
 * @group bugs.1477
 */
function testAccountCannotGoBelowZero()
{
    // Some arbitary code
}

To see all groups that are available in your code run:

$ phpunit --list-groups

Note: the --list-groups switch should appear before the path to the test suite loader

You can also exclude groups while testing using the --exclude-group switch. This can be useful if you want to ignore all kohana tests:

$ phpunit --exclude-group=kohana

For more info see: